It’s a strange feeling seeing art exhibitions and galleries in reality, having seen them all before via blogs. I’d like to say nothing beats the real thing, but to be honest, a really good photograph will often make things look better than they really are (ask any real-estate agent). That’s not to say I’m disappointed with the reality, but more a comment on the power of good photography. For example, The Serpentine Pavilion has some excellent photographs taken of it, and on arrival, it’s certainly a great little project with some nice spaces, however (and maybe this is the architect in me) once I was there I couldn’t help but start picking out defects, and little mistakes. Even the pool that makes up the roof of the project was less the crisp, dark, reflective pool I’d been made to believe and more of a rusted, algae filled dish, which included quite a lot of wriggling, squirming life within it. Still amazing, for sure, but reality has certainly turned out to be a bit more rough around the edges. This of course has frustrating implications, as I’m starting to realise that the sleek, well designed detailing I’ve seen in beautiful close up shots on blogs and which I hopefully intend to one day design myself are A: not just hard to do, but B: almost certainly not like that in reality.

It’s a strange feeling seeing art exhibitions and galleries in reality, having seen them all before via blogs. I’d like to say nothing beats the real thing, but to be honest, a really good photograph will often make things look better than they really are (ask any real-estate agent). That’s not to say I’m disappointed with the reality, but more a comment on the power of good photography. For example, The Serpentine Pavilion has some excellent photographs taken of it, and on arrival, it’s certainly a great little project with some nice spaces, however (and maybe this is the architect in me) once I was there I couldn’t help but start picking out defects, and little mistakes. Even the pool that makes up the roof of the project was less the crisp, dark, reflective pool I’d been made to believe and more of a rusted, algae filled dish, which included quite a lot of wriggling, squirming life within it. Still amazing, for sure, but reality has certainly turned out to be a bit more rough around the edges. This of course has frustrating implications, as I’m starting to realise that the sleek, well designed detailing I’ve seen in beautiful close up shots on blogs and which I hopefully intend to one day design myself are A: not just hard to do, but B: almost certainly not like that in reality.

  1. chazhuttonsfsm posted this